What is Cervical Cancer?

HPV causes 99% of all cervical cancer cases3,4. When a female is infected with HPV and the virus doesn't go away on its own, abnormal cells can develop in the cervix. If left untreated, these cells may develop into cervical cancer11. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. Every day, five new cases are diagnosed, and two women lose the fight against cervical cancer in Malaysia. While the disease is most common among women aged 40-64, all ages are at risk once they are sexually active12.

What is Cervical Cancer?

HPV causes 99% of all cervical cancer cases3,4. When a female is infected with HPV and the virus doesn't go away on its own, abnormal cells can develop in the cervix. If left untreated, these cells may develop into cervical cancer11. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. Every day, five new cases are diagnosed, and two women lose the fight against cervical cancer in Malaysia. While the disease is most common among women aged 40-64, all ages are at risk once they are sexually active12.

What is Cervical Cancer?

HPV causes 99% of all cervical cancer cases3,4. When a female is infected with HPV and the virus doesn't go away on its own, abnormal cells can develop in the cervix. If left untreated, these cells may develop into cervical cancer11. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. Every day, five new cases are diagnosed, and two women lose the fight against cervical cancer in Malaysia. While the disease is most common among women aged 40-64, all ages are at risk once they are sexually active12.

Cervical cancer is the 2nd most common cancer among Malaysian women between the ages of 15-44

Everyday, five new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed, and two women lose the fight against this disease. While the disease is most common among women aged 40-64, all ages are at risk once they are sexually active.

Cervical cancer usually doesn’t produce symptoms. Most women with early cervical cancers don’t know they have it until the cancer becomes aggressive and spreads into other tissue11. When this happens, some of these signs may begin to show:

  • Bleeding between or following menstrual periods
  • Bleeding during or after sexual intercourse
  • Bleeding after menopause
  • Unusual vaginal discharge that is watery, bloody and foul-smelling
  • Pain or discomfort during sexual intercourse
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Unexplained change in menstrual cycle
HPV Vaccination
The HPV vaccine helps protect you against the HPV types that are most likely to cause cervical cancer11.

Pap Smear Screening
Regular Pap tests can help you detect early changes in the cervix that may be cancerous. If abnormal changes are detected, further tests will be carried out to determine the extent11.

Safe Sex
Condoms can reduce your chances of getting HPV, but they don’t protect you completely since some areas of the skin remained uncovered and susceptible to infection11.

You can protect yourself

Getting infected with HPV is more common than you might think. The good news is there are two easy steps you can take to protect yourself.

SPEAK TO A DOCTOR

It can be hard to know what to say. Here are some helpful questions you can take to your next appointment.

Make an appointment

Find a clinic closest to you and set up an appointment to speak with your doctor about vaccination and screening.